Tag Archive for Social Media

Flying high in a crisis

WestJet run one of my all time favourite Twitter accounts, it’s friendly, humorous and useful. They have also produced one of the best ever Youtube videos from a company.

Recently they’ve been doing a great job in a much more challenging situation. A series of bomb threats to their planes has resulted in diversions, delays, speculation and a lot of questions.

They’ve handled it admirably with all the key ingredients of a good social media crisis response

1. Fast and authoritative updates

 

2. Shareable informative messages

 

3. Directing people to relevant information from partners

 

4. Not engaging in speculation and encouraging others not to speculate

 

5. Answering questions

Reply

 

 

6.Thanking supporters

Thanks

 

7. Moving on with confidence

There’s a lot to be learned from their social media and crisis handling. They have a fantastic style and tone that really hits the mark no matter what the situation.

Let’s hope they can get back to fun YouTube videos soon.

Why am I seeing this? – the science behind Facebook advertising

 

I recently took part in a Wolf Run. I’m glad I can tick it off the list but I won’t be rushing to do another one, it’s the only run I’ve ever finished wanting a blanket and a cup of tea.

As with lots of things that I get involved in I liked the Wolf Run Facebook page, mentioned the event in posts before and after the run and was tagged in photos from the day, covered from head to toe in mud.

Trainers covered in mud

Since then, I’ve noticed something very interesting. For the last month these are the ads that have been appearing in my Facebook timeline.

Facebook adverts for runs

 

Pretty much exclusively. I haven’t really seen adverts for anything other than running events, especially of the outdoor, muddy variety, and physical challenges. A click on the ‘v’ symbol and selecting the ‘Why am I seeing this option? ‘ tells me why.

i don't want to see this

ad preferences

 

Facebook thinks I am interested in running and physical fitness, which is a fair assumption based on my recent activity. But it does highlight a flaw in a computer generated algorithm – there is no account of the ‘never again’ feeling I have about another Wolf Run or similar.

Facebook is keen to tailor updates and ads to your personal preferences so if you are seeing ads in your Timeline that you don’t like, make sure you have a look at why you are seeing the ad and change the topics you are interested in if they aren’t accurate. You can’t remove ads from your Facebook timeline altogether but you can make sure they are for stuff you might be interested in.

On the other side of things, as an advertiser, this ability to target is brilliant. You can advertise to people based on their age, gender, location, interests and habits. Plenty of people who did the Wolf Run loved it and will be signing up for the next one and other similar events so I’m sure some of the ads I’ve seen will have been very successful. The cost of those adverts will also have been far less than in a printed publication.

Interestingly one of the few non-running adverts I’ve seen recently was for Land Rover and that was because I like Volvo, so companies large and small are using Facebook adverts to target potential customers.

So, next time you’re on Facebook have a look at the ads in your feed and why you’re seeing them, it might give you ideas for how you could use Facebook advertising and how to tailor them.

A dog’s dinner of a crisis response

Crufts is in the news for all the wrong reasons at the moment and there are now over 108 000 signatures on a petition to strip Rebecca Cross of her Best in Show win.

Petition

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Twitter sentiment score from Topsy is just 14% positive from over 3000 tweets a day on the topic of Crufts.

Topsy 14

 

 

 

 

 

Compared to the sentiment over the last 30 days of 70% positive it’s clear their reputation is taking a hit.

Topsy 70

 

 

 

 

 

So, how are they handling it on Twitter? To be honest it’s a dog’s dinner. These are all the tweets they’ve sent from @KCLovesDogs since the end of the competition.

Screenshot 2015-03-11 14.26.22

Screenshot 2015-03-11 14.26.46

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surely one tweet with a link to the full statement on their website would have been more effective and much easier for other people to share.

 

The Mother’s Day tweet that precedes them is yet another example of the dangers of scheduling tweets and not thinking to delete them if circumstances change.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since then silence! An advanced Twitter search for tweets sent to @KCLovesDogs shows lots and lots of people asking them questions (some polite, some not worthy of a response), criticising them, and wondering what is going on.

In the absence of information from the Kennel Club, people have started creating and sharing their own material, their own stories about what happened, and they are spreading all over social media, without proper explanations or rebuttals. There is nothing for dog lovers to counter stories with, even if they wanted to show their support for Crufts.

Own content

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The good ingredients of a crisis response include: regular updates, taking control of the situation and clearly demonstrating that you have, monitoring closely what is being said, myth busting, responding to reasonable questions, allowing your supporters to help you, and continuing those efforts for as long as it takes for the crisis to end and for your reputation to be either protected or rebuilt.

Perhaps there really isn’t anything else the Kennel Club can say, maybe things are as bad as others are making out, but I’m sure there are some updates, some responses, some engagement that could be made before their sentiment score drops into single figures.

Literally as I did a final check to see if there had been any further Twitter activity I spotted these, again presumably automated tweets, to web articles about how to support the Kennel Club and access their grants!

 

Tweets since

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No Best in Show win for @KCLovesDogs! Definitely must do better.

 

Who sees your tweets?

It’s a funny one to get the hang of until someone shows you, but important to remember that if you put an @ at the start of any tweet you are limiting who sees that tweet.

To make it easy to understand we’ll use two accounts @clairet18 and @jamesturner1912 (which just happen to be me and my husband)!.

So this tweet, with Hi at the beginning, will show up in the timelines of everyone who follows me. James will also get a notification to say that I have mentioned him.

 

If I tweet it with the @ at the beginning James will still get a notification but the tweet will only appear in the timelines of people who follow both of our accounts.  

The tweets are also visible to anyone on Twitter whether they follow us or not, if people go and look for them.  The first one would show up if people look at all my tweets.

tweets

To see the second one, they need to look at my tweets and replies.

tweets and replies

So if you are naming another account in your tweet but you do want all of your followers to see something make sure there is a . or something else at the very beginning of your tweet.

Some tweets not appearing to all of your followers can be really useful. For example if you don’t want to bombard people who follow you with conversations you just want to have between one or two people, or you are a company using Twitter for customer service. It means followers of the @londonmidland account will see their updates and information,

but not every tweet they send in response to customer questions, comments and complaints.

If you’re keen to know what the overlap between two accounts is, you can use followerwonk. James and I have an overlap of 46 followers!

Followerwonk

Also remember if you do want to keep your conversation completely private, use Direct Messages – here’s mine explaining to James, that I was about to use his account to create the examples above.  Only he and I had access to that conversation, until I screen capped it, nothing is ever truly private on social media! Happy tweeting!

DM

Blues head to the top of the social media table

Today is Trevor Francis Day #TFday; a celebration of one of Birmingham City’s favourites who became the game’s first million pound player when he was sold to their opponents today, Nottingham Forest.

Trevor Francis courtesy of Birmingham Mail

Trevor Francis courtesy of Birmingham Mail

My love for Blues started early, had my dad had his way, I would have been named Trevina Francesca in honour of the hat trick he scored on the day I was born!
 

Times have moved on a bit since then, Chelsea spent more than £16million on agents fees last year. This season social media is more important than ever for football clubs to engage with their fans.

Birmingham City may not be able to match the all singing all dancing second screen TV match day app of Manchester City. But their understanding of great social media means they have top flight accounts. They get the balance of content, tone, and integration into their overall communications. The figures are impressive 200 000 Facebook likes and 80000 Twitter followers but more importantly they way they use the channels, their interaction with fans, and their approach are key.

So what can we learn from how they do it?

Different channels work better for different things, BCFC’s Facebook page is a place for fans to chat to each other, feedback to the club, share tips on away grounds, and something all fans love reminisce about the good old days! The club does post updates on match days but thanks to Facebook’s newsfeed not appearing in time order, it doesn’t always make sense, by Saturday night it can be that a popular pre-match post will appear above one with the final score on!

Twitter works perfectly for match updates and the club do minute by minute updates so fans around the world can follow the action in real time. The club are very adept at using hashtags, regular ones include #bcfc, #keeprighton (the club’s song), #bcfclive and #bcfcawaydays. They also create them for special events, for example the new manager Gary Rowett #rowettreturns, and with success; #TFday has reached 3/4 million accounts at the time of writing. They use hashtags already popular on Twitter to increase their reach; #throwbackThursday and #FlashbackFriday are perfect for reviving memories of past glories. The club also took part in #bidtoremember.

Many of the players have Twitter accounts, the club retweet their post match thoughts as they tweet them, giving fans a chance to interact directly with their heroes. Several staff at the club have accounts too including the head of retail @wayen_cowen, allowing the club to promote special offers, @BCFCticketlady who provides social media customer service, and until recently @_andywalker_ who has been responsible for much of the club’s social media success. He has now moved on to the FA. These personal touches really help fans to feel involved in their club and connected to what is going on.

Like all football clubs, Birmingham City are lucky to have great content for their youtube channel particularly player interviews and match highlights. They package them really nicely and promote them via Facebook and Twitter.

Steven Knight and Gary Rowett

Steven Knight and Gary Rowett

The club aren’t afraid to use the same content in different places where appropriate. This very popular photo of manager Gary Rowett with Peaky Blinders writer Steve Knight was both tweeted and used in the programme.

Tweets are used to create an article in each programme. The club also do a weekly news story on their website of the top 5 most popular social media posts on each channel.

As I found working at the Environment Agency, when there are issues and they receive a lot of negative press coverage, the reaction on social media is usually less negative and more supportive. Even after an 8-0 drubbing fans bounced back and really rallied round as rumours grew that Gary Rowett was to be the new manager.

Last year Birmingham City came top of the Championship teams in the Sport Social Media Index. If only they could have a few league points for the quality of their social media!

Claire Turner
@clairet18 (aka Trevina Francesca!)

I’m dreaming of a West Jet Christmas

Twas the month before Christmas, when all through the world,
Not a person was stirring from WestJet’s Youtube.

With just nine weeks until Christmas, one thing I’m really looking forward to is West Jet’s Christmas promotion.

Two years ago they did a fun and popular flash mob video, it has now reached 1.5million views and was well received, and I’m sure they were pretty pleased with how it went.

Last year they went so far and above that I’m not sure how they will follow it. They produced one of the best videos I’ve ever seen.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIEIvi2MuEk&w=560&h=315]

Passengers waiting to board West Jet flights tell Santa, via a video link, what they want for Christmas. While they are en route over 150 West-Jetters (West Jet staff), volunteering their own time, source and wrap the requested presents. When the passengers reach their destination, out come the presents on the luggage carousel, including a “big tv”. The man who said he needed new socks and underwear was particularly disappointed when he realised what was happening!

West Jet got this so right, the idea is brilliant and the execution is perfect to create a truly heart warming video that is a fantastic advert for their company.  They said they would donate flights to a needy family if they got 200,000 views. They managed that in a few hours. Within two days two million people had seen the video. After a week, 13 million people in over 200 countries had viewed it. To date over 36million people have watched it. The bloopers video has had more views than the 2012 flash mob video had in total.

West Jet is a company that prides itself on treating staff and customers well, and this epitomises that. It shows them listening to their customers, getting to know them, providing exactly what they want, delivered by staff who are prepared to give up their time to keep customers happy. For them it’s a gift that keeps on giving, costing a fraction of a traditional TV ad, generating millions in positive press coverage, and no doubt encouraging many people to fly with them this year just in case in happens again.

The only headache for the West Jet communications team is how they can possibly top it this year? I can’t wait to see what they come up with.

By Claire Turner

@clairet18